PROJECTS

Museum of Cultural Revolution Clocks

Jianchuan Museum Cluster - Museum of Cultural Revolution Clocks


Location: Jianchuan Museum cluster, Anren, Dayi, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

Time: 03/2003 -03/2007

Building Area: 3,885 m²

Site Area: 5,200 m²

Chief Architect: Liu Jiakun

Team: Yang Ying, Song Chunlai, etc.


Project Overview:

The scheme of this project demands that the surrounding commercial streets shall make a concession to allow the museum to occupy the central area of the site. The museum will attract the flow of crowds towards the center while the shops around it can promote the commercial gains of the museum in return. It is a chance for cultural and commercial organizations to develop a pattern of mutually beneficial and win-win cooperation. We expect the architecture to fully meet the commercial objective by inserting the museum in the center of a commercial district in decline.

The museum is consisted of three parts connected by an arcade, adopting classical two-dimensional planes such as circles, squares and crosses to create a “holy space”, of which the tranquility and sacredness form a stark contrast with the worldliness of the surrounding business district. Such a contrast intensifies the atmospheric tension between commercial reality and historical remains, resembling a traditional Temple-Street relationship that flourished in the old days.

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Museum of Cultural Revolution Clocks

    Jianchuan Museum Cluster - Museum of Cultural Revolution Clocks


    Location: Jianchuan Museum cluster, Anren, Dayi, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

    Time: 03/2003 -03/2007

    Building Area: 3,885 m²

    Site Area: 5,200 m²

    Chief Architect: Liu Jiakun

    Team: Yang Ying, Song Chunlai, etc.


Project Overview:

The scheme of this project demands that the surrounding commercial streets shall make a concession to allow the museum to occupy the central area of the site. The museum will attract the flow of crowds towards the center while the shops around it can promote the commercial gains of the museum in return. It is a chance for cultural and commercial organizations to develop a pattern of mutually beneficial and win-win cooperation. We expect the architecture to fully meet the commercial objective by inserting the museum in the center of a commercial district in decline.

The museum is consisted of three parts connected by an arcade, adopting classical two-dimensional planes such as circles, squares and crosses to create a “holy space”, of which the tranquility and sacredness form a stark contrast with the worldliness of the surrounding business district. Such a contrast intensifies the atmospheric tension between commercial reality and historical remains, resembling a traditional Temple-Street relationship that flourished in the old days.